Guest Post: Exercising After Breast Surgery

Brenda Panin is a blogger and a full time mom of two beautiful girls. She enjoys healthy life, exercising and preparing healthy meals for her family. In her free time she loves to read about plastic surgery.

No matter what type of breast surgery you have, it can make it difficult for you to do normal every day things, such as being able to take a deep breath or to move your arm or your shoulder normally. This can make activities such as taking a bath/shower or getting dressed difficult. It is important to do exercises after breast surgery to limit the difficulties you could have.

As with any surgery, there are typically restrictions that you are placed on for a period of time. This is to ensure that your body has time to begin healing and that you will not cause yourself any injury. Because of this, it is important to ensure that you have your doctor’s permission before beginning any exercises. Some of the exercises can be done just a few days after the surgery and others should wait a few weeks, but your doctor will be able to give you directions on this.

One type of exercise that can be done is rolling your shoulders. You will start by bringing your shoulders up, backwards, down, and forward. You should repeat this ten times and then reverse the motion in the opposite direction for another ten repetitions. This particular exercise is a great one to start with. It helps to stretch out the muscles in your shoulder and chest.

Another great exercise that helps to stretch your muscles begins by sitting and clasping your hands together on your lap. Keep your head straight and looking forward. Keeping your hands clasped together and your elbows level with each other, you will then begin to raise your hands up in front of you. You should continue to slowly raise them up and over your head to the back of your neck. You will then want to slowly spread your elbows out away from your body while keeping your hands on the back of your neck. Once you have your elbows spread out to your sides, you will want to hold this position for about one minute. You will then slowly reverse the movement, bringing your elbows back in and slowly moving your clasped hands back over your head and down until they rest in your lap.

This exercise could pull and put some strain on the place of your incision. If it does, you should pause in the position you are in and take some breaths in through your nose and let them out slowly through your mouth. Because of the strain and discomfort, you may not make it all the way through this exercise the first few times, but as you continue to do this exercise, your muscles will stretch and the strain on your incision will ease.

This next exercise will help you regain the strength and ability to reach behind your back, which is quite important for things such as hooking your bra. You will put both your hands behind your back and hold the hand on the side of the surgery with your other hand. You will then want to slowly move both of your hands up your back as far as you can. If you begin to feel pain or strain, you should pause and breath in through your nose and out through your mouth. If the pain and strain passes, you should again try and move upward. Once you have gotten to the furthest point you can reach, you should hold the position for one minute. Then slowly move your hands back down your back.

Exercising after breast surgery is important in getting the mobility back in your arm and shoulder that you had prior to the surgery. Following these exercises can help get the normal functionality back in your arm.

Thanks for this great article, Brenda! This is a subject I’m sure a lot of women have many questions about.

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