Bizarre Ways People Find CHC

When I named my blog, I fully expected people to see its title and go “Huh?” Actually, that was my intent. So I wasn’t surprised when I found a list of bizarre search terms that led people to view my blog. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Vegetable cats
  •  Semi colon attack
  • Tech baby
  • Maria Sharapova jumpin butt hot
  • Cut out the crap
  • Putting on shoes (Maybe they thought I could help?)
  • Do beans really make you toot 
  • American Heart Association jokes

Creepiest snack display of all time.

Anyway, these made me laugh out loud. (Or was I laughing at my classic American Heart Association jokes?)

Some of the other key words I noticed on the list were Ansel Adams, tanning, Yoga, cats, Greek yogurt, and coffee. Take out the tanning and you just summed me up.

Q: Have you ever looked at the Search Terms that brought people to your blog?

Oh well. However you found me, I’m sure glad you did!

My Healthy Tip of the Day: Eat a grapefruit! “Grapefruit helps you lose weight by helping you feel fuller faster and longer. This is largely due to grapefruit being a great source for dietary fiber.”

Hi; I Use Semicolons Improperly;

I’d first like to credit this entire article to all of those who improperly use semicolons as a cheap ploy to pad their work (blog entries, research papers, etc) and who love to use GRE vocabulary words that they do not understand. A blog entry regarding this hotsy totsy topic is currently in the works.

The main source of this article can be found on theoatmeal.com.

So what’s the point of a semicolon? Well according to The Oatmeal and every other grammar source known to man, a semicolon is used to connect two independent clauses. So basically it is taking two ideas that could stand alone like, “My cat has a serious face. She finds little humor in my jokes.” With a semicolon, the sentence would look like this: “My cat has a serious face; she finds little humor in my jokes.” Never use a semicolon if an and, but, or, nor, for, so, or yet can be used.

When is a semicolon appropriate to use? According to The Oatmeal, use  a semicolon when forming a bond between two statements, typically when they are related to or contrast with one another. A semicolon can also be used as a “super-comma”, which basically means it can be used when making a list of items that are separated with a comma. For example, “My favorite places to shop include Banana Republic, a place where I can always find cute tops; Forever 21, a store that always adds a touch of funk to my wardrobe; and New York and Company, a great place to grab dress clothes for work.”

Finally, use a semicolon to connect sentences that contain internal punctuation, such as commas. For example, “When Bubby and Bobby are mad at each other, they’ll often resort to slapping; cats are all about the slap fights.” According to The Oatmeal, if a period would have been used in this sentence, the connection between the two clauses would have been lost.

So let’s review. When a strong desire to link two independent clauses arises, just add a semicolon. Just make sure the two ideas can stand alone. If making lists that contain commas is your thing, add semicolons. Finally, if your sentence contains two clauses that deserve a strong connection, but contain internal punctuation, add a semicolon! Just make sure to follow these rules, and I can assure that your writings will not be mocked. Maybe.